A Writer’s Review: Extraordinary Means

Well, I was not expecting it to have all of the emotions of John Green’s; The Fault In Our Stars, but that was exactly what started to happen as I got closer to the end. This would be the third book i’ve read about cancer. Well, actually, it’s not about cancer, it’s about TB. But this story was about Lane and Sadie. Two young teens who have both ended up at a hospital for young ones with tuberculosis. I really enjoyed the storyline, I loved the characters and what was going on. I found it really easy to follow along with. Again this book grabbed the style of using two characters to tell the story. Switching chapters between Lane and Sadie. I think this was used in a really good way, to keep the pace of things and make it easy to see what was going on. It also meant that you could see the emotions, thoughts and reactions from both sides.

Unfortunately though, one thing I think that to a degree failed with this book, was the progression. It took a long time for it to get anywhere. I would say the first 60% of the book was introducing us to the characters, the world around them and building their back story. It wasn’t until the near end when connections started to happen and events began to un fold. I’ve been thinking about this, and deciding whether that’s a good or a bad thing. Was the book unenjoyable? No, it was an enjoyable novel. Did I find myself bored at times? No, I found it quite easy to read. So why would the slow progression be negative? Honestly, I’m not sure. I feel a story is a story, and you need to have a beginning, a middle and an end. Whereas this felt like a beginning, a beginning and then an end.

– Michael Topschij.

A Writer’s Review: The Beginning of Everything

We all get a tragedy. Yes, yes we do. That’s the theme of Robyn Schneider’s; The Beginning of Everything which tells the story of Ezra Faulkner. The everyday popular kid at high school. Except there was a little bit of a difference, Ezra had something dramatic happen to him (ended up cripple following an accident) and started taking a little bit more of a deep look at things. This introduced us to Cassidy, his new found love interest. A new girl with a mysterious past, the new girl that doesn’t quite fit in or go with the flow.

I really loved this book, it continues to be another book that reaffirms my love affair for young adult fiction. The American high school scene, the ecstatic cheerleaders and the live young die hard attitude of today’s youth (god I’m twenty, did I just say that?). But really, that’s what happened as I was reading through this. It showed a lot of the classic attitudes of kids these days, and the lack of desire that some have to, do the right thing, treat others with kindness and be generally all out good people. Of course I’ve definitely got to take a step back and remind the whole “age” thing makes an impact. But with that being said, when I meet characters like Ezra and Cassidy in novels like this, it reminds me a lot of some of the great & similar friends that I’ve met.

I don’t have an intense, in depth review for this. But that definitely does not mean I want to fault it, because the story was so wonderful and easy to read. It was enjoyable to keep turning pages and the characters, events and storyline of this was really just an overall enjoyable young adult novel. I loved learning about debate teams and seeing some of the more intellectual types this young world has to offer. It reminds me of high school and when the whole “debate” thing was offered one day. I had definitely considered it, and reading this book, makes me regret not giving it a go. That being said, who of us doesn’t wish they could have done high school differently, am I right? (Insert smirking emoji face here). Thanks Robyn for a wonderful read.

– Michael Topschij.